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Showing posts from September, 2011

How does HashMap work in Java

We all know and must have used HashMap, its a Map interface implementation. It stores keys and its corresponding value. Keys cannot contain duplicates and can contain at the most one null key (HashTable does not allow null as key, FYI). It has non synchronized methods unlike HashTable. It does not guarantee the order of retrieval (it changes every time the HashMap is modified) etc etc. Enough of this now..


So how does HashMap work?
Basically when this question is asked it generally means how is the object stored and retrieved from the     HashMap. But of course with the get and put methods in the Map API. Easy isn't it, but that is not what
meets the eye. We need to understand what goes inside to understand the answer to the title of this topic.

So what happens when you put a key/value pair in the HashMap, Firstly, hashCode of the key is retrieved and supplied to hash function to defend against poorly constructed hashCode implementation; to get a new hash value. This value is then …

Immutable classes

An object is said to be mutable when the state of the object can be changed E.x. through the setter methods mostly (of course there are other alternatives to change the state, which we will understand once we step through the guidelines of creating an immutable class). Immutable objects are objects whose state cannot be changed after they are created. Once created their state remains the same till the lifetime of the application (rather every life of the application).


Why would one create an immutable objects?  


Immutability objects find their use in concurrent applications/ multi-threaded applications, such an object is always thread safe which means threads wont see an inconsistent state of such an object,so you don't have to synchronize access to them across threads.They also are good candidate in Hash based collections like HashSet  (they need to override equals and hashCode methods). You can freely share and cache references to immutable objects without having to copy or clone …